Biblionasium – a reading network for the Under 13 crowd

Tour of BiblioNasium from Coach Manzee on Vimeo.

In a previous post last year, I lamented the lack of options the under 13 crowd is getting in Web 2.0 tools. Most of the free ones lock out children under 13 and the ones that have dedicated education sites can cost an arm and a leg in subscription fees. Occasionally you get gems like Edmodo and StoryJumper who are both free and Under 13 friendly. Today, thanks to my blogging friend Henrietta Miller, I came across another Under 13 friendly, free Web tool, Biblionasium.

For anyone familiar with Shelfari, the Amazon book related social networking site, Biblionasium works in a similar way but has been built specifically for the under 13 student. It is a teacher/parent controlled tool that acts as a reading journal and book sharing/recommending site. The video above, from the site itself via Vimeo, explains the site’s features in fairly good detail.

In a nutshell, teachers are able to set up a class site and assign children usernames and passwords to login. The students can record what they are reading, the teachers can monitor and recommend books to read and, with parent permission and control, students can ‘friend’ each other and share/recommend books to each other. Teachers have options of adding reading level indicators to books so they and parents can monitor the skill level their children are choosing to read at and encourage them to challenge themselves ( or conversely recommend books that are more reading ability appropriate.

Because Australian schools are on holidays, I haven’t had much of a chance to check out how it works but from what I have seen it seems like an excellent reading tool to add to your literacy program. I was able to search for a wide range of books to add to my list ( every search I did was successful, including Australian books) and I set up a couple of dummy student accounts using my own children without a hitch.

I actually like the level of involvement it encourages from parents. While the teacher sets up the account, ( although a parent could do it personally for their child if the school doesn’t use it) for the social networking features, which is where I see the benefits of sharing and recommending books with fellow students, can only occur if the parents grant the permission through the site. This puts the parents into an active role with the reading program, something we need more of in schools today.

Some of the more mature Grade 5/6 students may find its interface a bit cheesy, with its chimpanzee mascot, but other than that it is good to find  an educational tool aimed specifically at the younger child. It could be a great incentive and resource in particular for the early to middle grades (Grades 1-4). Check out the video above, go to the site and explore. It could prove worthwhile.